We Love From: Making a difference in someone else's life

24/05/2021
We love from Packages

 

We love from

Georgina Flores and Lorena Mier y Teran are the founders of We Love From (WLF), a letter-writing initiative which they run from their hometown in Merida, Mexico. They met during the Creative Leadership conference in 2020 and struck up a friendship when they discovered that they lived in the same city.

A couple of months after the conference finished, Georgina came up with the idea of sending letters of love and hope to people across the world who are facing difficult situations. Lorena loved the idea and together they founded We Love From.

They reached out to their friends and family and even to schools, asking people to create handwritten letters to Lebanon, Zimbabwe, Honduras and Colombia. The response was amazing and surprising. Those who received the letters were so filled with joy, they expressed their gratitude on social media.

‘I would never have thought that with a piece of paper, a pencil and a little bit of your time and effort, you can really make a difference in someone else’s life!’ says Lorena.

This experience has taught Georgina to ‘never underestimate the power of [my] ideas, even if they seem small’.

I would never have thought that with a piece of paper, a pencil and a little bit of your time and effort, you can really make a difference in someone else’s life!

______________________________________________________________

 

We took the opportunity to ask Georgina and Lorena a few more questions:

How did the idea of We Love From come about?
We wanted to give emotional support to people who were far away – and this was a relatively easy way to do so. We also wanted to engage as many people as possible, and to increase awareness of what is happening all across the globe. Letter-writing achieves both of these goals.

 

We love from

How do you implement the project? 
We ask people from Mexico to write letters of hope and encouragement to a different destination each time. We send their letters to someone we know in the country concerned and they distribute them to shelters, NGOs, random people on the street, etc.

 

How do you choose the destinations?
Initially we talked to friends in different countries and planned all the logistics with them, making sure they would be able to receive and distribute the letters. Now that more people are interested in the project, we have received messages from people asking for their country to be a WLF destination and offering themselves as receivers and distributers.

 

What is the biggest lesson you have learnt from the process?
One of the biggest lessons is that something as simple as a pencil and a paper can really change a person’s day or perspective. It can make someone feel hugged and create connection even if the writer is not physically there.

 

Lorena, you have mentioned that reading the cards before sending them off is your favourite part. Why?
I love reading words that come from the heart, from children, youngsters and adults, and the creativity which makes each letter unique. It makes me very happy to think of people taking time to write a letter to a stranger, sending them good wishes and support, and to think that someone will smile the way I did when reading the letter.

 

Georgina, what is your favourite part and why? 
My favourite part is when the people receive the letters (even though we haven’t been there to experience it). We love it when people go to the trouble of letting us know that they received a letter and felt moved by it, and that it brought them hope and made their day. Then you know it is all worth it.

 

What are your future plans for We Love From? 
We want to explore more destinations and make the project bigger and to create more awareness about situations around the world. One challenge is how to sponsor the shipping cost for each destination. We are working on this.

 

What advice would you give anyone who wants to start a project? 
Start first, worry second. There will always be problems you didn’t anticipate but that doesn’t mean you won’t be able to solve them. Start and you will figure things out as you go. If you never start you will never know where you could end up. If you believe in your project and you are passionate about it, people can feel that. As they get moved and excited, more and more people will join you.

 

 

 

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